Phelsuma quadriocellata pair in a 55 gallon?

Mourning_Gecko

New member
Hey all,

Been a while since I've posted but I hope you all have been well.

I was at a local shop and came across a Phelsuma quadriocellata in a 5-gallon and had to take it home for me. Because of the unprepared pick up I've currently placed them in a heavily planted and climbable 10 gallon for the next few days.

I've been considering building a 55-gallon bioactive set up and getting an additional gecko for the enclosure regarding size [48" x 13" x 21"] wanted others' thoughts.
 

Mourning_Gecko

New member
Thank you, Aliza and Elizabeth!

I've been contemplating on getting one as my focus has been shifting more to Phelsuma species so this is the start of a downward spiral for me.
 

Elizabeth Freer

Active member
The best I can do is literally copy & paste this.

Phelsuma quadriocellata (Peac ock Day Gecko) Care Sheet
Source: Z. Brinks from Josh's Frogs
12 September 2019



Adult-Peackok-Gecko-27.jpg Peacock-gecko-217.jpg Adult-Peackok-Gecko-05.jpg
(click to enlarge)​

LOCATION & DESCRIPTION
The Peac ock Day Gecko (Phelsuma quadriocellata) is a brightly colored species found in Madagascar. Their name refers to the conspicuous black spot outlined in blue that is found behind their forelegs. Unlike others in its genus, its widespread range and abundance on the island has given this species some protection from being endangered. Like all day geckos, they tend to be too quick and nervous for handling, but they make great pets to watch due to their bright colors and diurnal nature, both characteristics of the genus.

COLORATION
Like all geckos in the genus Phelsuma, these geckos exhibit bright and attractive colors. Peac ock Day geckos are dark green or bluish green, often with a blue tail. Reddish orange spots speckle their back. Their most unique feature are the black spots outlined in blue right behind their forelegs. They also have two smaller black spots right in front of their hind legs.

HOUSING
A 12x12x18 Exo Terra enclosure can house a pair of Peac ock Day Geckos. Larger enclosures can house more individuals, but it is recommended that males are not housed together. A variety of substrate mixtures can be used with coco fiber or peat moss as a base. Josh’s Frogs BioBedding works very well with this species; in addition to holding moisture, it will help propagate and maintain live plants and isopod populations in the setup (both highly recommended with this species).

As an arboreal species, these geckos thrive in a setup filled with pieces of cork bark, branches, large bamboo sticks, and live or fake plants. It is essential to provide an enclosure with plenty of climbing material and hiding places. Peac ock Day Geckos can be kept at ambient temperatures ranging 72-78F. A basking area of around 85F should also be provided using a halogen light. As with all day geckos, given their diurnal activity, UV light is recommended.

Ambient humidity for this species should remain around 60-70%. Misting every day is strongly recommended to keep the substrate moist and also provide water droplets from which the geckos can drink. There should be enough ventilation such that any water droplets on the walls of the enclosure dry out by the next day. A shallow water dish can be supplied but is not necessary if these geckos are misted daily. Both temperature and humidity can be monitored with a thermometer/hygrometer.

SIZE
These day geckos will grow to be around 4-5.5 inches as adults.

DIET
Peac ock Day Geckos are omnivorous. In the wild, they consume insects as well as nectar or soft fruit. In captivity, they enjoy a staple diet of small crickets and gecko diet mix. A good rule of thumb for size is to only offer insects whose length does not exceed the space in between the gecko’s eyes. Generally, hatchling Peac ock Day Geckos should be fed melanogaster fruit flies and gecko diet mix, adding ⅛-inch crickets as they grow older. Reaching adulthood, they can continue to be offered gecko diet mix once a week as well as ¼-inch crickets. Feeder insects should be dusted with a vitamin/mineral supplement.

SEX
Peac ock Day Geckos can be challenging to sex when young, but are fairly straightforward to sex when they are mature. Females are larger, and tend to have prominent calcium sacs under their chin. Males have a row of enlarged femoral pores on the underside of their thighs, flanking the cloaca. The scales around these pores are often yellow.

BREEDING
During the breeding season, these geckos will lay a pair of eggs every month or two. Eggs are often adhered to plants, branches, or the enclosure walls. Attempting to remove them from where they are glued will break the egg.


Peac ock Day Geckos are listed as having a stable population by the IUCN:
 
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Mourning_Gecko

New member
Thank you!

This will continue to help my knowledge with this little fella! I've been eating info up like it's breakfast. :)

I'll definitely take photos once I finalize the tank plus will makes me reorganize my other enclosures for my P. gradis I also have.
 

Elizabeth Freer

Active member
Thank you!

This will continue to help my knowledge with this little fella! I've been eating info up like it's breakfast. :)

I'll definitely take photos once I finalize the tank plus will makes me reorganize my other enclosures for my P. grandis I also have.
You ARE welcome!

:coverlaugh:
 

czaha

New member
Thank you!

This will continue to help my knowledge with this little fella! I've been eating info up like it's breakfast. :)

I'll definitely take photos once I finalize the tank plus will makes me reorganize my other enclosures for my P. gradis I also have.

I am not sure if you will see this, but please be careful introducing even a male and female together in a large tank. I would also try putting the female in the tank first for a few days then introduce the male. These are extremely territorial gecks that do not play well together. The parents also eat their young. I do not agree with Josh's article about multiple females in one tank they also can kill each other or stress each other out enough that you lose one or all. I have a lone male now in my 45-gallon tank because he became aggressive to his partner and I had to remove her to her own enclosure. Sadly this was my breeding pair. I find I cannot even keep babies in one tank together as one is usually dominant and will stress out its cage mate, resulting in one not getting enough food to grow well.

The bottom line for Pea****s is, one tank per Quad unless you want to breed then have extra tanks available. Parents will always eat their young so you have to either find the eggs and remove them or watch closely for hatchlings.

Pea****s and Neons are my favorite and both are little characters. I do find the trick to Pea****s is to make sure they are used to seeing people around their tanks or they tend to be very skittish and hide a good portion of the time. They also need well-planted tanks with bamboo, Sanseveria, and Pothos. I find Sanseveria to be a favorite which works well in the heat of tanks and Pothos is quick growing.
 

Elizabeth Freer

Active member
I am not sure if you will see this, but please be careful introducing even a male and female together in a large tank. I would also try putting the female in the tank first for a few days then introduce the male. These are extremely territorial gecks that do not play well together. The parents also eat their young. I do not agree with Josh's article about multiple females in one tank they also can kill each other or stress each other out enough that you lose one or all. I have a lone male now in my 45-gallon tank because he became aggressive to his partner and I had to remove her to her own enclosure. Sadly this was my breeding pair. I find I cannot even keep babies in one tank together as one is usually dominant and will stress out its cage mate, resulting in one not getting enough food to grow well.

The bottom line for Pea****s is, one tank per Quad unless you want to breed then have extra tanks available. Parents will always eat their young so you have to either find the eggs and remove them or watch closely for hatchlings.

Pea****s and Neons are my favorite and both are little characters. I do find the trick to Pea****s is to make sure they are used to seeing people around their tanks or they tend to be very skittish and hide a good portion of the time. They also need well-planted tanks with bamboo, Sanseveria, and Pothos. I find Sanseveria to be a favorite which works well in the heat of tanks and Pothos is quick growing.
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[MENTION=66572]Mourning_Gecko[/MENTION]
 

Mourning_Gecko

New member
[MENTION=70592]czaha[/MENTION] Thank you so much for the additional information! It's really appreciated as I move forward while planning on the enclosure build for mine. Currently, my single male has been exploring the mysteries of the current enclosure that sits in my office on my desk. So far interactions have been positive, usually, he'll come out once I'm in the room and sit on a plant in the corner of his tank closest to me and watch what I'm doing.

If you have photos of your enclosure, I'd love to see it!
 

czaha

New member
Here is a pic of my 24x18x24 tank that now only houses my male, since I had to remove his mate due to aggression. Hopefully, my pic shows up since I have not tried adding pics in this forum.
HoudiniHome.jpg
 
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